800 language country

Mount Tarvurvur in Papua New Guinea

Can you imagine a country in which 800 different languages are spoken?

What makes a region to have different tongues is isolation of the human groups. When we have different islands and different tribes which barely have contact among themselves, we get something as impressive as Papua New Guinea.

Learning a language is not about studying and going to classes, but about communicating, and this is proof of it.

Keep Thinking!

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10 comments

  1. So are you saying that the people in PNG don’t communicate with each other? If there are 800 languages, wouldn’t that make it difficult? That is of course if no one learned the other languages.

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      1. It makes me wonder why they didn’t just get a common language after a while just to make things easier. I remember Indonesia was the same quite a while ago then the government decided to bring in ‘Bahasa Melayu’ (or now known as Indonesian) and made it the language used at school and for government, and well the rest is history.

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      2. Some populations prefer to continue their own culture no matter what, so that might be a reason, but that’s a very good point. Something similar happened in Spain in the basque region when their local language ‘euskera’ was so fractured in different dialects they had to build up a common one.

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      3. Sure, that’s known since the roman empire times when they claimed and promoted Latin as the lingua franca. However, little languages are also important for a certain community so the answer is simple, we must speak at least a couple of languages.

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